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Programming
Build native-looking apps for iOS

Lately, I've been messing around with cool HTML5 stuff a lot. One of the things that HTML5 is trying to reach, is the market of mobile devices. A long time ago (when I got my first iPhone), I wrote an article on how to add a webclip for easy access to your website. But since then, I've learned a couple of more things on how to build native-looking apps for iOS using only HTML.

iOS HTML Template

I've created a template/boilerplate that you can use for your next project to create native looking apps for iOS (more specifically: Mobile Safari) using nothing but HTML. Simply build your website starting with this template, bookmark it and you're done.

View or download the source code and read the comments carefully to see what's needed to create a native looking app using only HTML.

Demo iOS HTML Template   Download iOS HTML Template

If you don't feel like fully digging into the source, but learn the pieces bit by bit, feel free to read on further. Take note that this will only work when the user bookmarks your webpage. The changes to any existing projects can be made easily, just make the following changes in the head section of your page and you're ready to go!


Tags:  ios iphone ipad native html
 
Working with Websockets

HTML5 has some extremely cool features, and a couple of weeks ago I took a deep dive into Websockets. This protocol, which you can recognize by the ws:// and wss:// (secure websockets) URL prefix, enables "Server side push events".

Working with Websockets

During my deep dive, I learned a couple of things that are pretty interesting. If you're into/learning HTML5, you really should try out Websockets! In my opinion, it's one of the coolest technologies they've added. Are you ready to dive and learn more about Websockets? Here are a couple of things to keep in mind when working with Websockets.


Tags:  html5 websockets connectivity tips
 
Experimenting with the element() CSS function

Just like I said in my previous article; Since Firefox 4 was relesed, loads of new (CSS) features were released into the wild. Next to the :any() CSS selector, another cool CSS feature was added to the Gecko engine that I wanted to check out, and is called the element() function.

Experimenting with the element() CSS function

According to the specification, this function does the following: Starting in Gecko 2.0, you can use the element() CSS function to use an arbitrary HTML element as a background image for background and background-image. That sounds pretty interesting! Take note this only works in the latest version from Firefox, and still needs the -moz- vendor prefix (so the complete function call will be -moz-element()).

Demo element() experiment   Download element() experiment

You can directly view the source from the demo to check what kind of small experiments (or checking out some bad practices) I did, but I would recommend you to read why the experiments are interesting.


Tags:  element css function firefox background
 
Why you want to use the :any() CSS selector

Since Firefox 4 was relesed, loads of new (CSS) features were released into the wild. Ofcourse, this is a great thing, since Firefox has a rock solid place as 2nd most popular web browser. More people will actually be able to see all the nifty stuff you'll create using CSS.

I recently came accross a CSS selector that was included in Firefox 4 (and is added to Webkit (nightly) as well), called the :any() selector. We'll take a look at what this selector does, and why you would want to use it.

any() selector

Be aware that the :any() is not part of the CSS3 specification (yet), but since Webkit already implemented it, I'm pretty sure others will follow as well. Also, to make it work in Firefox, use the -moz- vendor prefix, resulting in :-moz-any (-webkit- vendor prefix for Webkit). So let's see what this :any() selector can do for you.


Tags:  any css selector firefox webkit
 
Webkit Bug: Hover and Sibling Selector

Not only Internet Explorer has it flaws when it comes to parsing/using the CSS file. Even though the Webkit engine is the best CSS engine out there (at the moment), I was still able to find a little bug while searching for a solution to a problem last week.

Although the bug is really small and you'll probably never need to use it in real life, I did want to give it a little attention (just in case you do want to solve this problem). I found this one since I wanted to create another Proof of Concept for an article here. Of course, I hope this problem could be solved in the next release of the engine.

Webkit Bug

In simple words, this bug occurs when combining the generic sibling selector (in CSS: ~) in combination with the hover event (in CSS: :hover). Dive into the example/source code to see how it looks like, and think about the effect you think it would produce.

Demo Webkit Bug   Download Webkit Bug

Take note this is a webkit bug only: The example works just fine in Firefox, Opera (and yes - even in Internet Explorer!). It doesn't work in those browsers using webkit: Safari and Chrome. Now let's dive into the problem, and look at possible solutions for this bug.


Tags:  webkit bug hover sibling selector css
 
jQuery quickie: Unlimited Scroll using the Twitter API

Time for another relatively simple jQuery tutorial, just like my previous jQuery quickie. At work, I'm currently working with Silverlight and implemented unlimited scroll. This is a great technique that could be used on loads of websites. Instead of the regular pagination, where the user has to click to see the next page, unlimited scroll automatically loads the next page when the user is at the bottom.

I wanted to take this technique and port it to another jQuery example. So the quickie for today is Unlimited scroll using jQuery. I've using the Twitter API to make the example, so you'll learn a little bit about JSON too.

Unlimited Scroll using the Twitter API

Simply check out the demo to see the first tweets from my Twitter stream. Scroll down to load more tweets and see the unlimited scroll in action.

Demo Unlimited Scroll using the Twitter API   Download Unlimited Scroll using the Twitter API

Of course, you can use this same technique for something else instead of loading tweets, for example for loading next blog posts etc. Now, let's take a look at how you can create this Twitter example.


Tags:  scroll twitter jquery tutorial simple
 
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